2018 Perpetual Folly Literary Magazine Ranking — Non-Fiction

Below is the 2018 Perpetual Folly Literary Magazine Ranking for Non-Fiction. Go here to read about the methodology.

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2018 Magazine 2017 2018 Score
1 Sun 1 59.5
2 Orion 2 56.5
3 Georgia Review 3 48
4 Tin House 4 31.5
5 Gettysburg Review 6 29.5
6 New Letters 4 27.5
7 Ploughshares 7 26
8 Conjunctions 7 22.5
8 Threepenny Review 15 22.5
10 Agni 9 21.5
10 n+1 11 21.5
10 Salmagundi 17 21.5
13 American Scholar 19 20
13 Granta 9 20
13 Point, The 12 20
16 River Teeth 15 18
17 Iowa Review 17 17.5
18 Fourth Genre 13 16.5
19 Paris Review 13 16
20 Ecotone 21 15.5
20 Missouri Review 20 15.5
22 Antioch Review 24 13.5
23 Boulevard 23 13
24 Creative Nonfiction 22 12.5
24 Virginia Quarterly Review 28 12.5
26 Southern Review 24 11.5
27 Image 27 11
28 New England Review 29 10
29 Kenyon Review 26 8.5
29 Narrative 29 8.5
31 Believer 31 8
31 Pinch 31 8
33 Colorado Review 35 7.5
33 Southampton Review 88 7.5
33 Yale Review 33 7.5
36 Blackbird 35 7
36 Brevity 78 7
38 Hunger Mountain 37 6.5
39 Ninth Letter 37 6
39 Oxford American 40 6
39 War, Literature and The Arts 44 6
39 World Literature Today 41 6
43 Raritan 37 5.5
43 Shenandoah 41 5.5
45 American Circus 44 5
45 Fourth River 44 5
45 Gigantic 44 5
45 New Orleans Review 44 5
45 Radio Silence 44 5
45 Ruminate 44 5
45 Third Coast 44 5
52 Brain, Child 41 4.5
52 Harvard Review 55 4.5
52 Hudson Review 44 4.5
52 Normal School 58 4.5
56 Big Roundtable 67 4
56 Broad Street 58 4
56 Michigan Quarterly Review 55 4
56 Southwest Review 44 4
60 Alaska Quarterly Review 58 3.5
60 American Poetry Review 62 3.5
60 Brick 62 3.5
60 Sweet 62 3.5
60 TriQuarterly 58 3.5
60 Water-Stone Review 55 3.5
66 Five Points 70 3
66 Prairie Schooner 78 3
66 Sewanee Review 62 3
69 Boston Review 70 2.5
69 Fugue 44 2.5
69 Great River Review 70 2.5
69 In Character ©  70 2.5
69 Milkweed Editions – Press 70 2.5
69 News from the Republic of Letters (?) 33 2.5
69 Seattle Review 70 2.5
69 Tusculum 70 2.5
77 American Athenaeum (?) 78 2
77 Bellevue Literary Review 88 2
77 Hedgehog Review 78 2
77 Lapham’s Quarterly 78 2
77 Los Angeles Review 67 2
77 Massachusetts Review 88 2
77 Mount Hope 103 2
77 O-Dark-Thirty 78 2
77 Prism 78 2
77 Witness 103 2
77 Electric Literature 2
77 Guernica 2
77 Offing 2
90 Arts & Letters 78 1.5
90 Baffler 88 1.5
90 Cimarron Review 70 1.5
90 Florida Review 78 1.5
90 Gulf Coast 88 1.5
90 McSweeney’s 78 1.5
90 Memoir © 88 1.5
90 New Ohio Review 88 1.5
90 North American Review 88 1.5
90 Subtropics 88 1.5
90 Under the Sun 88 1.5
90 Willow Springs 88 1.5
90 ZYZZYVA 88 1.5
103 A Public Space 103 1
103 Alimentum 88 1
103 American Chordata 103 1
103 Arts Fuse 103 1
103 Bellevue Literary Press 103 1
103 Bomb 103 1
103 Bookforum 103 1
103 Camera Obscura 103 1
103 Catamaran 103 1
103 Catapult 103 1
103 Chautauqua 103 1
103 Chicago Review 103 1
103 Common, The 103 1
103 Dart Society 103 1
103 Delmarva Review 103 1
103 Diagram 103 1
103 Epiphany 1
103 Epoch 103 1
103 Fifth Wednesday 103 1
103 Five Chapters (?) 103 1
103 Heyday Books 103 1
103 Hopkins Review 1
103 Hub City Press 103 1
103 Malahat Review 88 1
103 Natural Bridge 103 1
103 Oregon Humanities 103 1
103 Provincetown Arts 88 1
103 Slice 1
103 Tavern Books 103 1
103 Tikkun 103 1
103 Timberline Review 103 1
103 Tupelo Press 103 1
103 Wilson Quarterly 103 1
103 Zone 3 103 1
103 Barrelhouse 1
103 True Story 1
139 American Interest 141 0.5
139 Asia Literary Review 141 0.5
139 Bat City 141 0.5
139 Black Pearls 141 0.5
139 Blood Orange Review 141 0.5
139 Callaloo 141 0.5
139 Canteen 141 0.5
139 Columbia Review 141 0.5
139 Europa Editions 141 0.5
139 Fiction 141 0.5
139 Fiction International 141 0.5
139 Free Inquiry 103 0.5
139 Haystack Mountain 141 0.5
139 Healing Muse 141 0.5
139 High Country News 141 0.5
139 High Desert Journal 103 0.5
139 Hotel Amerika 141 0.5
139 Idaho Review 141 0.5
139 Kyoto Journal 141 0.5
139 Literary Review 141 0.5
139 Manoa 103 0.5
139 Meridian 141 0.5
139 Minnesota Review 141 0.5
139 New Haven Review 141 0.5
139 Noon 141 0.5
139 North Dakota Quarterly 62 0.5
139 Open City 141 0.5
139 Oregon Quarterly 103 0.5
139 Other Voices © 141 0.5
139 Packinghouse Review © 103 0.5
139 Parnassus 141 0.5
139 Passages North 67 0.5
139 Nelle (formerly PMS) 103 0.5
139 Post Road 141 0.5
139 Relief 141 0.5
139 River Styx 103 0.5
139 Rosebud 141 0.5
139 Rumpus 141 0.5
139 Santa Monica Review 91 0.5
139 Seneca Review 141 0.5
139 SN Review 141 0.5
139 Stone Canoe 141 0.5
139 Stranger 141 0.5
139 The Journal 141 0.5
139 University of Michigan Press 141 0.5
139 Wag’s Revue 141 0.5
139 Writers Chronicle 141 0.5

2015 Reading: Creative Nonfiction, Issue 53, Fall 2014

CNF_53_Cover_8_20-1My subscription to Creative Nonfiction is new and this is the first issue I’ve read. I read essays from time to time, of course, but usually not so many all at once. I have to keep reminding myself that they aren’t short stories. Oh, yeah. This is real.

The theme for this issue is Mistakes, which is a great theme. I’ll only mention some of my favorites from the thematic part of the issue. The best, I think, is “Lessons” by Catherine Musemeche, an excerpt from her book. The author is a pediatric surgeon and in this piece she recalls learning from an experienced doctor about being extra careful, and how to deal with mistakes. But she also recalls her own mistake, or what may have been her mistake, one that she managed to catch during surgery before it had catastrophic results. Also interesting was “Still, Standing” (the comma placement being quite deliberate) by Ennis Smith, about the author’s foray into nude modeling during a period of unemployment. And then there’s the horrific piece, “Don’t Scream,” by Bill Pitts, about “extreme forms of protest in a prison work camp.” Yeah, I’d call 36 intentionally broken legs pretty extreme.

But I also enjoyed two pieces outside of the thematic section because they’re by friends of mine (who happen to be fine writers). First is “The Correctors” by Carol Fisher Saller. Carol is a copyeditor, and in this piece she notes wryly that sometimes copyeditors make mistakes, too. So she admonishes readers to be forgiving of the occasional typo in printed work. “A typo is a typo,” she says, “not a sign that the barbarians are at the gate.” (Oh, boy, I’m guilty of loud complaints about typos in books I’ve paid nearly $30 for, but I’ll try to let those go in the future. I’ll try, but I probably won’t succeed.) More importantly, she suggests educating yourself about the current state of things. After all, some of what we learned about punctuation has changed since we were in school (at least when I was in school). Good advice.

The second is something of an experimental piece by Scott Loring Sanders about his father. It’s called “My Father” and every paragraph begins with those two words. The effect is quite moving.

The last piece I’ll mention is “Platforms are Overrated” by Stephanie Bane. Although the author is a newly minted MFA, she has extensive experience with an ad agency and recently has worked in digital media. She says that the conventional wisdom that you have to have a platform is bullshit. (Her term, not mine.) What’s true about her argument is that social media and blogging isn’t as effective a tool to sell books as we’ve been led to believe, or maybe as used to be the case. The Catch 22 is that the publishing industry—agents and editors—hasn’t figured that out yet. So for most of us looking to land a book deal, the platform is still valuable. What happens after the book gets published is another story.

But even then, I’m not sure she’s right. I think of Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Now, by all accounts, that’s a fine and important book. (I confess that I own it but have not yet read it.) But part of what made the book a bestseller is that Skloot prepared the ground for it by building the best platform ever. Here’s a discussion of her experience. The point is that platform building isn’t just about Facebook, Twitter, and a blog post now and then, and I’m not sure Bane gets that. So read this piece, but take it with a grain of salt. We all have to do what we can and what we can afford to get the word out about our work. For some of us, the tools are pretty limited.

Tips for Writers: New Year Resolutions

I haven’t had the most productive writing year, for a variety of reasons (i.e., excuses). I’m determined to do better in 2013. It’s time, then, for some . . . resolutions.

My resolutions tend to be of the standard, non-writing variety: Lose Weight (I started my diet in October, so I got a jump start on that one); Exercise More (ditto); Drink Less (what, are you kidding me?). One I plan to work on between now and the end of the year is cleaning my office (not to mention the rest of the house) so I can start the new year with an uncluttered work space.

So my life is in pretty good shape . . . except when it comes to the writing. And here, thankfully, a friend just passed along some guidance from the Creative Nonfiction blog that I intend to take to heart: Keep Your Writing Resolutions This Year! Now, you should take the time to read the original, which goes into some detail, but here’s the basic list of tips for making effective resolutions:

  1. Get Specific (also realistic)
  2. Make Time (no excuses; for me, it helps to stick to a specific schedule every day, but that may not work for everyone)
  3. Get a Partner (the buddy system works)
  4. Move Past Doubt (“give yourself permission to do some bad writing” — Frank Conroy)
  5. Write it Down (But not just the main resolutions–see number 1–but make lists along the way with some specific milestones; I love lists, or, more accurately, I love crossing things off my list, so this is a good one for me.)
  6. Be Still (This is a biggie for me–basically it means find a way to disconnect from the internet, your phone, etc. It’s hard, but . . . find a way.)

That’s the short version. Be sure to read Anjali Sachdeva’s original for more detail.